Coral reefs cover less than 1% of the ocean floor yet provide habitat for 25% of all marine species making them amongst the most biodiverse ecosystems on earth.  Since the 1970’s 80% of the main reef building coral in the Caribbean has died.  People rely on coral reefs for food, jobs, flood protection and development of new medicines.  The Coral Conservation Society works to raise awareness of the need to restore and conserve coral.  We participate in coral larval propagation research and active reef restoration of endangered Acropora coral on the Mesoamerican Reef off the Caribbean coast of Mexico. 

 

 
OUR STORY

Coral Conservation Society is a small Canadian non-profit foundation which contributes to coral spawn collection, fertilization and transplantation of endangered coral on the Mesoamerican Reef.  Our goals are to:

  1. Support coral conservation and restoration.

  2. Contribute to and further coral conservation and restoration research.

  3. Further the training and education of those working to conserve and restore coral.

  4. Teach children and adults about coral reefs: why they are important and the threats they face.

  5. Raise awareness of the immediate need to conserve and restore coral.

  6. Encourage public support for coral conservation, restoration, research and education.

STATUS OF CORAL

Coral reefs cover less than 1% of the ocean floor yet provide habitat for 25% of all marine species making them the most biodiverse marine ecosystem on earth.  People rely on coral reefs for food, jobs, flood protection and development of new medicines.  500 million people in at least 90 countries benefit from coral reefs.

 

Since the 1980’s global coral reef cover has declined between 30-50%.  In the Caribbean since the 1970’s, 80% of the main reef building coral has died.  On Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, 50% of the coral has died since 2016.  Acropora coral in the Caribbean is now on the IUCN red list, one step away from “Extinct in the Wild.”  

The major cause of coral decline is climate change as corals are not adapting to warming seas.  The world has warmed to 1⁰ and is currently on track to for 3.2⁰C.  In an IPCC report released in October 2018, scientists estimate that at 1.5°C of warming we’ll lose about 80% of coral reefs.  At 2°C, more than 99% of all coral reefs will be gone.  To keep warming at 1.5⁰C we will need to be carbon neutral by 2050.  Overfishing, pollution and local stressors are other main causes. 

WHAT WE ARE DOING

The Coral Conservation Society works to raise awareness of the need to restore and conserve coral.  We participate in coral larval propagation research and active reef restoration of endangered Acropora coral on the Mesoamerican Reef off the Caribbean coast of Mexico.  In Canada, we provide elementary school presentations on tropical coral reef ecosystems.  We are a small organization consisting mostly of volunteers.

Our Work

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WHAT YOU CAN DO

We can help coral reefs by tackling climate change, using less plastic, buying local goods and eating only sustainable seafood.  We can financially support coral conservation and we can follow these guidelines when visiting reefs:

  • When swimming or snorkelling be careful never to stand on or even touch corals (the slightest contact will harm them and their rate of growth is extremely slow).

  • Stay horizontal in the water while you are near or above the reef.  Keep your fins up and away from the fragile coral.

  • Avoid kicking up sand which may settle on the coral and reduce the light available for the coral to photosynthesis it’s required energy.

  • Take nothing living or dead from the water except for recent garbage.

  • If you feel uncertain in the water, wear a life vest for added buoyancy.

  • Avoid purchasing coral souvenirs and souvenirs made from other sea life.

  • Wear sun protective clothing instead of applying harmful sunscreens. Use sunscreen containing titanium or zinc oxide instead.

  • Choose tour boats that are careful not to damage reefs, use of mooring buoys as opposed to anchors are best.

  • Avoid eating unsustainable seafood (overfishing is one of the greatest threats to ocean ecosystems including coral reef ecosystems), or better yet, avoid eating seafood entirely.

  • Reduce green house gas emissions as often and as much as you are able.   (Warming seas and ocean acidification, the results of global climate change, threaten the health, growth and survival of coral world-wide.  Reducing emission of green house gases like carbon dioxide and methane will aid in the global movement to keep warming under 1.5⁰ C.)

  • Visit and support Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and support other coral conservation projects.

  • Contribute towards coral reef restoration and research.

 
CONTRIBUTE

There are currently three projects available for sponsorship.  If you or  your business  would  like to support coral conservation by funding one of these projects, we welcome your inquiry about our project sponsorship program. 

Contact us at coralconserve@gmail.com

PROJECTS:

2021 Summer Elkhorn coral spawn capture & larval propagation research                              $6,200

2021 Summer Staghorn coral synchronous spawn timing observation & determination      $1,200

Flow-thru raceway tanks for growing coral micro-fragments and experiments                     $2,900

Any indvidual donations are greatly appreciated.  To donate within Canada or internationally, click the Paypal donate button or e-Transfer to coralconserve@gmail.com. (As a registered BC non-profit society, we are unable to issue federal income tax donation receipts).  Thank you!

 

STAY IN TOUCH

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Coral Conservation Society

BC Registered Non-Profit Society

White Rock, BC, Canada

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ABOUT

coralconserve@gmail.com

Coral Conservation Society

BC Registered Non-Profit Society

White Rock, BC, Canada

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